Recommend the Personal MBA Book List

I recently read a blog post from Ben Casnocha on business books, self-education and mental models. It was quite fascinating as he posted an email dialogue between himself and Josh Kaufman. Josh runs the Personal MBA website and has published “The 77 Best Business Books In Print“.

I never counted exactly how many books I read at Oxford but I know that many of these were not on the list (but wish they were). I purchased a few and want to read all of them but I’ll have to practice the discipline of selection until I have another year to just read and study …. not any time soon.

I’d recommend browsing the list it for those that enjoy b-books. I must warn you it can be a bit overwhelming viewing 77 titles at once. Make sure you’re signed into Amazon!

About The Personal MBA Recommended Reading List:

This page lists all PMBA-recommended books and resources for easy printing, bookmarking, and reference. For more information about the Personal MBA, book selection criteria, and project history, read the manifesto.

  • For in-depth descriptions of each book, click on the name of the category.
  • To jump directly to Amazon.com, click on the name of the book.
  • To purchase this entire library of books from Amazon.com at a substantial discount, check out the Personal MBA Complete Business Library.

Girl Perfect Book Review

Kelly’s first cousin, Jennifer Strickland (Porter), will have her first book ready for purchase this September. Kelly had the opportunity to read it before it was out. Her official review:

“This is honestly one of the best, most heartfelt, most compelling,
pure and truthful books I have read. I have no doubt that Jen’s dream
will come true of being able to reach out to young women everywhere
with the love of Christ through her life story. Hold onto your hats!
You cannot read Girl Perfect without looking deeper into your relationship with the Maker!”

— Kelly Marie McFadden, writer and developer, HomeWord

For information on ordering a book, click here

What some others have said:

“Jennifer writes with a raw honesty about her journey in a world where
your value is determined by your appearance. The girl in the picture
was beautiful, but her depleted, hollow soul was the price. Deep into
her spiral, sitting at a table, she whispers the word ‘God’ and is
introduced to the One who could love her deeply and free her from
‘perfect.’ Few will ever live in the world she did, but many need to
hear her message of the tragedy of getting caught up in a pursuit of
externals and missing where true life, joy, and passion really lie.”

— Nancy Ortberg, Former Teaching Pastor, Willow Creek Community Church



I wish every young woman could read Girl Perfect to
help them be very careful what they dream for. And every mature woman
who reads it will surely be encouraged to be satisfied with who they
are and how they look. You or someone you know needs to not just read
this book, but to truly take it into your heart and spirit. I pray it
will illuminate truths you have never seen before.”

— Stephen Arterburn, Founder and Chairman, New Life Ministries

To read more reviews click here

WeThink

Charlie Leadbeater has released an interesting book on mass creativity and innovation (well sort of released, it’s actually now online for mass collaboration). We-Think: the power of mass creativity.

Here’s an excerpt:

The basic argument is very simple. Most creativity is collaborative. It combines different views, disciplines and insights in new ways. The opportunities for creative collaboration are expanding the whole time. The number of people who could be participants in these creative conversations is going up largely thanks to the communications technologies that now give voice to many more people and make it easier for them to connect. As a result we are developing new ways to be innovative and creative at mass scale. We can be organised without having an organisation. People can combine their ideas and skills without a hierarchy to coordinate their activities. Many of the ingredients of these forms of self-organised creative collaboration are not new – peer review for example has been around a long time in academia. But what is striking about Wikipedia, Linux, Second Life, Youtube and many more is the way they take familiar ingredients and combine them to allow people to collaborate creatively at mass scale.

The rest is here:
http://www.wethinkthebook.net/book/home.aspx

ABOUT THE AUTHOR (from the website)

Charles Leadbeater is one the world’s leading authorities on innovation and creativity in organisations. He has advised companies, cities and governments around the world on innovation strategy and drawn on that experience in writing his latest book We-think: why mass creativity is the next big thing, which charts the rise of mass, participative approaches to innovation from science and open source software, to computer games and political campaigning.

www.charlesleadbeater.net